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FELLOWSHIPS

We are seeking people driven by curiosity and inspired by openness, who are willing to work collaboratively across disciplines, with a mission to translate knowledge into pathways to practical solutions. Fellows should excel at what they are doing.

  • Independent and collaborative projects

    As with any Institute of Advanced Study, fellows at THE NEW INSTITUTE can pursue their own projects.

    As a Platform for Change, we also expect our fellows to devote half of their time to collaborative work in the respective fellow group. Within the programme framework of THE NEW INSTITUTE, fellow groups devise questions for collaborative exploration, developing tangible outcomes with societal relevance during their residency. Possible outcomes include (but are not limited to) discussion papers, policy papers, pilot projects, prototypes, artistic representations, multi-stakeholder dialogues, outreach activities, atypical alliances.

    Publications and any other results arising from the collaborative research work during the fellow's stay will be published under the aegis of THE NEW INSTITUTE. Publications arising from the fellow's own work will be published independently by the fellow with reference to funding from the THE NEW INSTITUTE.

    Fellows generally work within one of our programmes in groups of up to 15 people. Exchanges across individual fellow groups is explicitly desired. Most groups comprise around 70% academics and 30% practitioners from other sectors such as activism, politics, art, media, journalism, business, administration.

    Each programme has one or more programme directors who steer the group. Each fellow group is accompanied and supported in its collaborative work by a programme manager.

    We operate on the basis of following code of conduct.

  • Timing and duration

    As a rule, fellowships for academics last for 10 to 12 months, in some cases up to 24 months. Fellow stays for people from politics, activism, art, media, journalism, business, and administration comprise 6 months or shorter periods - with flexible start dates. Stays of less than one month are also possible - in this case, however, not as fellows, but as guests. The fellow year usually begins on October 1st and runs until August or September of the following year. Non-academic fellowships can have more flexible start dates.

    For the joint fellow work, it is ideal if as many fellows as possible begin on this date. We understand this is not always possible, and individual residency periods can also be arranged. During their stay, we ask fellows to be present in Hamburg four days a week. We will honor all religious and cultural holidays. There will be no collaborative fellow work around the turn of the year, during Easter break and in July and August.

  • Endowment and financial support

    1. Established academics - principle "leave of absence"

    Established academic fellows usually come to THE NEW INSTITUTE on a leave of absence or research sabbatical from their regular position, e.g. a chair. They continue to receive their salary, while THE NEW INSTITUTE covers the costs of the replacement at the respective fellow's home institution.
    In addition, there is a stipend that is sized to cover additional expenses. These include:

    • A contribution to the rent, which is subsidized by the THE NEW INSTITUTE at 100%. Fully furnished apartments are provided, typically in the Warburg Ensemble.
    • A contribution for meals in the Warburg Ensemble during the week.
    • Costs are covered for travel to and from Hamburg (also for partners and family).
    • Individual research costs can be agreed upon, on a project-by-project basis.
      The fellowship is generally tax-free in Germany. Social security contributions are not paid. Usually, the corresponding contributions are continued by the position granting the leave. The result is a "no loss, no gain" financial situation for the fellows.

    2. Early to mid-career researchers - principle "THE NEW INSTITUTE connection"

    Fellows at the early to mid-career researcher level receive an individually negotiated stipend, which roughly corresponds to the endowment of junior researchers at the corresponding career level in Germany and is usually between 3,000 and 4,000 euros net (including family allowances, if applicable). This includes a subsidy for health insurance.
    The scholarship is generally tax-free in Germany. Social security contributions are not paid, but the stipend is calculated in such a way that fellows can make voluntary contributions to a pension plan.
    From the stipend, fellows pay, among other things:

    • 100% of their health insurance
    • A contribution to the rent, which is subsidized by the THE NEW INSTITUTE at 80%. Fully furnished apartments are provided by the THE NEW INSTITUTE; usually located in the Warburg Ensemble.
    • A contribution for meals in the Warburg Ensemble during the week.
    • Costs for travel to and from Hamburg, also for partners, will be covered.
      Individual research costs can be agreed upon, depending on the project. Please note: Similar to other Institutes of Advanced Study, THE NEW INSTITUTE is a place for thinking, discussing, analyzing existing data, preparing publications – less so for empirical studies, surveys etc. In this vein, individual research costs are meant to cover expenses related to the participation in conferences pertinent to the project of the fellows, the invitation of short-term guests, the organization of small workshops. Books and publications necessary for pursuing the respective research projects will be procured independent of the individual research costs whenever possible.

    3. Fellows from other fields

    For fellows from journalism, activism, politics, business, art and administration agreements are made depending on the individual constellation.

  • Living and working

    Our home is the Warburg Ensemble – nine historic townhouses side-by-side in the heart of Hamburg. Fellows (and their families, if applicable) live and work at the Warburg Ensemble during their stay.

    We can host up to 35 fellows.

    We provide fully furnished apartments for fellows, usually, in the Warburg Ensemble, with kitchenettes and private workspaces. We welcome fellow partners and children, and can tailor individual accommodation needs and requirements accordingly. Our Fellow Services team can assist with all matters regarding schooling, daycare and general relocation. For further questions please contact our head of Fellow Services Alexandra Kunze directly: alexandra.kunze@thenew.institute.

    In addition to apartments, the Warburg Ensemble comprises a wide range of workspaces for solo and collaborative work, a library, several meeting rooms and event spaces. We nurture a social environment at THE NEW INSTITUTE, and mealtimes take place together in the refectory, where there is also a bar. A private garden behind the Warburg Ensemble runs the length of the nine buildings.
    Read more about the Warburg Ensemble.

  • How to join

    There are several ways to become a Fellow at THE NEW INSTITUTE:

    1. Unsolicited applications

    Unsolicited applications to be part of one of our ongoing programmes at the THE NEW INSTITUTE can be submitted at any time. All completed applications will be reviewed by a panel that meets several times a year. It may take up to four months from the submission of your application to hear a decision. Unsolicited applications are accepted from the following groups of people:

    • Scholars from all disciplines within the humanities and social sciences for fellowships of up to two years (at least 2 years past Ph.D.)
    • Representatives of politics, administration, business, art, media, journalism, activism with a strong interest in questions of ethics, social change, human behavior, awareness of ecologically and economically sustainable futures for fellowships of up to six months; a division into several shorter stays is possible.
      Candidates should identify with THE NEW INSTITUTE’s mission and be interested in contributing to social, economic, political and environmental transformation. They should have the ability to bring transformative ideas to the TNI, create new knowledge, and develop it with an eye toward workable solutions. Ideally, candidates have already engaged with networks beyond their own field (e.g., actors beyond academia using creative formats to create public effectiveness). Candidates must be highly interested in interdisciplinary and transsectoral contexts. A good command of English is a prerequisite.
      Unsolicited applications may be sent to programmes@thenew.institute (one pdf, condensed format). All applications must be submitted in English. Incomplete applications or applications that do not reference the overarching questions of the respective programme will not be accepted.
      Applications must include the following components:
    • Letter of motivation (how candidates want to contribute to the THE NEW INSTITUTE and what they expect from a fellowship; up to 5,000 characters, including spaces).
    • Curriculum vitae and list of publications or overview of major works, contributions, and projects.
    • Within the respective THE NEW INSTITUTE programme of interest: reference to one (or more) of the overarching questions formulated there both concerning collaborative work in the group and formulation of your own project proposal; up to 20,000 characters, including spaces
    • Work plan and time schedule
      If you have any questions, please contact Dr. Barbara Sheldon, Head of Research and Fellow Management: barbara.sheldon@thenew.institute.


    2. Nomination

    Nominations for ongoing programmes may be submitted on an ongoing basis by current fellows, alumni, and partners of TNI. All completed nominations are reviewed by a panel, which meets several times a year. It may take up to four months from the submission of the nomination to a decision. Nominations are accepted for the following categories:

    • Internationally recognized top academics from all disciplines within the humanities and social sciences for fellowships, usually for an academic year.
    • Representatives of activism, politics, arts, media, journalism, business and administration with a strong interest in issues of ethics, social change, human behavior, awareness of ecologically and/or economically sustainable futures, for fellowships of up to six months; division into several shorter stays is possible.
      Candidates should be outstanding, internationally recognized individuals in their respective fields who identify with THE NEW INSTITUTE´s goals and are interested in contributing to social, economic, and environmental transformation. Based on past success, they should have the ability to bring transformative ideas to THE NEW INSTITUTE and develop research findings with an eye towards practical solutions.
      Candidates have experience and demonstrated success working with networks beyond their own field of expertise (e.g., academics beyond academia using creative formats to create public effectiveness). Candidates must be highly interested in interdisciplinary and trans-sectoral contexts. A good command of English is a prerequisite.

    Nominations must include the following:

    • Letter of recommendation
    • Curriculum vitae and publication list or overview of the most important work

    If you have any questions, please contact Dr. Wilhelm Krull, Founding Director: wilhelm.krull@thenew.institute.



    3. Active recruitment

    THE NEW INSTITUTE management recruits potentially suitable candidates also by direct approach. Potential candidates are reviewed by a panel of experts who meet several times a year. As a rule, the following groups of persons are recruited:

    • Internationally recognized top academics from all disciplines within the humanities and social sciences, for fellowships of up to two years.
    • Representatives from activism, politics, economy, art, media, journalism, business and administration, with great interest in questions of ethics, social change, human behavior, awareness of ecologically and/or economically sustainable futures, for fellowships of up to six months; a division into several shorter stays as well as flexible periods of stay are possible.

    If you have any questions, please contact Dr. Wilhelm Krull, Founding Director: wilhelm.krull@thenew.institute.

  • Elkana Fellowship to promote free scientific exchange

    The conditions for the free circulation of knowledge and the unhindered exchange of scientific hypotheses have deteriorated in recent years around the world. The polarization and rigidifying of public debates are increasing, and societal and political forces are intervening more frequently in research and teaching, to the point that researchers are being persecuted, expelled, or deprived of their liberty. This narrows the scope for scientific controversies, which are the indispensable precondition for academic work. The Yehudit and Yehuda Elkana Fellowship invites researchers who have served the free exchange of knowledge and hypotheses and the open scope for academic controversies to spend three to six months at The New Institute in Hamburg or at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin - Institute for Advanced Study. The Fellowship is tied to financial support amounting to 50,000 Euros for projects that aim to preserve free scientific exchange. The program is funded by the VolkswagenStiftung and the Marga and Kurt Möllgaard-Stiftung. It cooperates with the Einstein Foundation Berlin.
    Applications for the Yehudit and Yehuda Elkana Fellowships are not possible; funding decisions are made solely on the basis of nominations.

    For additional information visit: wiko-berlin.de/en/institute/initiatives-cooperations/elkana-fellowships.

  • Diversity

    THE NEW INSTITUTE stands in solidarity with communities and organizations who call out systemic discrimination. However we acknowledge that to break down the barriers of systemic discrimination there is still a lot to do. We are undertaking a major policy review to address unconscious bias; and considering what part we can play in reforming the academic sector overall. We are auditing the constellations around our fellowship programs, our staff and our audiences, to assess successes and failures and bring about reform and innovation. Our values are guided by the people who work here, but also draws on the experience of external organizations dedicated to combating racial injustice and social inequality. THE NEW INSTITUTE embraces the opportunity to listen, learn and be pro-active in shaping an inclusive and representative future. Our ambition is to reflect society and bring all peoples closer to change.

FAQ

  • What characterizes a fellowship at THE NEW INSTITUTE?

    As with any Institute of Advanced Study, fellows at THE NEW INSTITUTE can pursue their own projects. As a Platform for Change, we also expect our fellows to devote half of their time to collaborative work in the respective fellow group. Within the programme framework of THE NEW INSTITUTE, fellow groups devise questions for collaborative exploration, developing tangible outcomes with societal relevance during their residency. Possible outcomes include (but are not limited to) discussion papers, policy papers, pilot projects, prototypes, artistic representations, multi-stakeholder dialogues, outreach activities, atypical alliances. Fellows generally work within one of our programmes in groups of up to 15 people. Exchange across individual fellow groups is explicitly desired. Most groups comprise around 70% academics and 30% practitioners from other sectors such as activism, politics, art, media, journalism, business, administration. Each programme has one or more programme directors who steer the group. Each fellow group is accompanied and supported in its collaborative work by a programme manager.

  • What kind of fellow programmes does THE NEW INSTITUTE offer?

    Our fellowship programmes generally address the most urgent questions of our time at the intersection of ecology, economy, democracy and the human condition. We aim to analyze what needs acting upon. And act upon analysis. At THE NEW INSTITUTE fellows work in either one of the following programmes:

    • The Foundations of Value and Values: What is a sustainable value system for the 21st century?
    • The Future of Democracy: Which governance structures and forms of decision making enable legitimate and effective systemic change for a sustainable future?
    • Economic Transformation: What is an economy that serves social and planetary needs?
    • The New Hanse: How can the City of Hamburg and its government become a model for digital and sustainable transformation?
    • Changing Mindsets – Changing Behaviours: What role do behavioural changes play in socio-economic transformations, and how can we ensure that they are just and inclusive?
    • Voices from the Past – Lessons for the Future: What can we learn from past protest movements to help us build a better future from the present?
  • What does a fellowship of THE NEW INSTITUTE comprise?

    Apart from a stipend we provide fully furnished apartments for fellows, usually in the Warburg Ensemble, located in one of the most exquisite neighborhoods in the centre of Hamburg. In addition to apartments, the Warburg Ensemble comprises a wide range of workspaces for solo and collaborative work, a library, several meeting rooms and event spaces. We nurture a social environment at THE NEW INSTITUTE, and mealtimes take place together in the refectory, where there is also a bar. A private garden behind the Warburg Ensemble runs the length of the nine buildings. We welcome fellow partners and children, and can tailor individual accommodation needs and requirements accordingly. Our Fellow Services team can assist with all matters regarding schooling, daycare and general relocation.

  • What is the duration of a fellowship, when does it start, how much presence is required?

    As a rule, fellowships for academics last for 10 to 12 months, in some cases up to 24 months. Fellow stays for people from politics, activism, art, media, journalism, business, and administration comprise 6 months or shorter periods - with flexible start dates. Stays of less than one month are also possible - in this case, however, not as fellows, but as guests. The fellow year usually begins on October 1st and runs until August or September of the following year. For the joint fellow work, it is ideal if as many fellows as possible begin on this date. We understand this is not always possible, and individual residency periods can also be arranged. During their stay, we ask fellows to be present in Hamburg four days a week. We will honor all religious and cultural holidays. There will be no collaborative fellow work around the turn of the year, during Easter break and in July and August.

  • What is the financial support offered to fellows who are established academics with a position at another institution?

    Established academic fellows usually come to THE NEW INSTITUTE on a leave of absence or research sabbatical from their regular position, e.g. a chair. They continue to receive their salary, while THE NEW INSTITUTE covers the costs of the replacement at the respective fellow's home institution. In addition, there is a stipend that is sized to cover additional expenses. These include:

    • A contribution to the rent, which is subsidized by the THE NEW INSTITUTE at 100%. Fully furnished apartments are provided, typically in the Warburg Ensemble.
    • A contribution for meals in the Warburg Ensemble during the week.
    • Costs are covered for travel to and from Hamburg (also for partners and family).
    • Individual research costs can be agreed upon, on a project-by-project basis.
      The fellowship is generally tax-free in Germany. Social security contributions are not paid. Usually, the corresponding contributions are continued by the position granting the leave. The result is a "no loss, no gain" financial situation for the fellows.
  • What is the financial support offered to fellows who are early to mid-career fellows with no position at another institution?

    Fellows at the junior researcher level receive an individually negotiated stipend, which roughly corresponds to the endowment of junior researchers at the corresponding career level in Germany and is usually between 3,000 and 4,000 Euros net (including family allowances, if applicable). This includes a subsidy for health insurance. The stipend is generally tax-free in Germany. Social security contributions are not paid, but the stipend is calculated in such a way that fellows can make voluntary contributions to a pension plan. From the stipend, fellows pay, among other things:
    100% of their health insurance

    • A contribution to the rent, which is subsidized by the THE NEW INSTITUTE at 80%. Fully furnished apartments are provided by the THE NEW INSTITUTE; usually located in the Warburg Ensemble.
    • A contribution for meals in the Warburg Ensemble during the week.
    • Costs for travel to and from Hamburg, also for partners, will be covered.
    • Individual research costs can be agreed upon, depending on the project.

    Please note: Similar to other Institutes of Advanced Study, THE NEW INSTITUTE is a place for thinking, discussing, analyzing existing data, preparing publications – less so for empirical studies, surveys etc. In this vein, individual research costs are meant to cover expenses related to the participation in conferences pertinent to the project of the fellows, the invitation of short-term guests, the organization of small workshops. Books and publications necessary for pursuing the respective research projects will be procured independent of the individual research costs whenever possible.

  • What is the financial support offered to fellows from other sectors?

    For fellows from politics, administration, business, art, media, journalism, activism agreements are made depending on the individual constellation.

  • How can I become a fellow?

    While THE NEW INSTITUTE management frequently recruits potentially suitable candidates by direct approach, there is also the possibility of submitting an unsolicited application to be part of one of our ongoing programmes at the THE NEW INSTITUTE at any time. All completed applications will be reviewed by a panel that meets several times a year. It may take up to four months from the submission of your application to hear a decision. Unsolicited applications are accepted from the following groups of people:

    • Scholars from all disciplines within the humanities and social sciences for fellowships of up to two years (at least 2 years past Ph.D.)
    • Representatives of politics, administration, business, art, media, journalism, activism with a strong interest in questions of ethics, democratization, social change, human behavior, awareness of ecologically and economically sustainable futures for fellowships of up to six months; a division into several shorter stays is possible.

    Candidates should identify with THE NEW INSTITUTE’s mission and be interested in contributing to social, economic, political and environmental transformation. They should have the ability to bring transformative ideas to the TNI, create new knowledge, and develop it with an eye toward workable solutions. Ideally, candidates have already engaged with networks beyond their own field (e.g., actors beyond academia using creative formats to create public effectiveness). Candidates must be highly interested in interdisciplinary and transsectoral contexts. A good command of English is a prerequisite.
    Unsolicited applications may be sent to programmes@thenew.institute (one pdf, condensed format). All applications must be submitted in English. Incomplete applications or applications that do not reference the overarching questions of the respective programme will not be accepted. Applications must include the following components:

    • Letter of motivation (how candidates want to contribute to the THE NEW INSTITUTE and what they expect from a fellowship; up to 5,000 characters, including spaces).
    • Curriculum vitae and list of publications or overview of major works, contributions, and projects.
    • Within the respective THE NEW INSTITUTE programme of interest: reference to one (or more) of the overarching questions formulated there both concerning collaborative work in the group and formulation of your own project proposal; up to 20,000 characters, including spaces
    • Work plan and time schedule
      If you have any questions, please contact Dr. Barbara Sheldon, Head of Research and Fellow Management: barbara.sheldon@thenew.institute.
  • The Foundations of Value and Values

    What is a sustainable value system for the 21st century?

    The programme “The Foundations of Value and Values” is motivated by a recognition that there are differing versions of how society and the economy function – and encourages a thorough thinking through of these various approaches to their logical conclusions.

    Read More
  • The Future of Democracy

    Which governance structures and forms of decision making enable systemic change for a sustainable future?

    The programme “The Future of Democracy” explores how to make democratic decision-making processes and the respective institutions fit for the future – more responsive to contexts, more equitable, and more sustainable.

    Read More
  • Socio-Economic Transformation

    What is an economy that serves social well-being within planetary boundaries?

    The programme “Socio-Economic Transformation” aims to find alternative ways to measure progress and develop rules of digital governance directed towards public interest and the common good.

    Read More
  • Changing Mindsets – Changing Behaviour

    What role do behavioural changes play in socio-economic transformations?

    The programme “Changing Mindsets – Changing Behaviour” aims to forge novel interdisciplinary and trans-sectoral alliances, drawing together research from neuroscience, psychology, data science, sociology, philosophy and economics, among others.

    Read More
  • The New Hanse

    How can cities use data to become more democratic and sustainable?

    The programme “The New Hanse” investigates the relationship between urban digital infrastructures, data justice, and sustainability, supporting the city of Hamburg’s transformation towards climate neutrality with tangible data-driven pilot projects.

    Read More
  • Voices from the Past – Lessons for the Future

    How do social movements lead to systemic change, when and why? What can we learn from past protest movements to help us build a better future from the present?

    The programme “Voices from the Past – Lessons for the Future” is analyzing key-moments in Europe and beyond, treating change as a generational practice as well as an exercise in memory.

    Read More

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